Colored Forest

Colored Forest Castle
Pretty trees and a big ole castle are sure fire drama. Stay in the castle!

“I stood alone in the colored forest and waited for them to come,” Red Twinkles told friends on Monday, “and they did and they seem very nice.” Yesterday Twinkles left the city walls again to meet the visitors, but has not returned and numerous search parties sent out into the colored forest have found no traces of her.

“She never feared anything or anyone,” a friend said. “When the visitors first arrived and sent fear through our city and we fell into darkness, she wanted to meet them. Everyone else I knew went out and bought a gun, or bigger locks for their door, but not Red. She went out to meet them.”

Most readers will recall the days prior to the visitors when our small village lit up the sky with bright lights and thriving industry. We once attracted tourists the way Mammoth Gardens does. Our impressive cathedral and its clock tower brought travelers from all over the globe. In those days, the colored forest hosted picnics and parties daily. Nobody feared to leave the city walls.

Those days are now a distant memory.

The visitors arrived from some devilish origin and sent fear throughout city. We became sick, anguished, untrusting, and probably a bit evil ourselves. A dark cloud of suspicion and anger grew in the village. Even the buildings and the surrounding land itself grew hazy and indistinct. The clock continues to send its bright illumination into the sky, but the rest of the architecture lies in shadowy darkness.

According to friends, Red Twinkles, a college student taking online classes from Mammoth Gardens University, believed the visitors to be victims of falsehoods and lies spread by the village ministry.

“She never believed any of the stories from the elders about the visitors,” Twinkles’ roommate said. “She went about her daily business as if she feared nothing. When she’d leave the city, I always worried about her, but she always returned happy. Last week, when she met the visitors for the first time, she was ecstatic.”

Twinkles returned the forest every day at sunrise to meet with the visitors and struck up some manner of friendship.

“We kept thinking she’d bring them home as friends, or pets, or whatever,” her roommate said. “I told her if she brought them to the apartment, I’d move out.”

Twinkles vanished before she could introduce the visitors to anyone.

Police believe the visitors found a woman alone in the colored forest to be easy prey and have taken her. The search parties working for the last forty eight hours have found no trace of her and no evidence of any type of struggle.

“Residents are advised to stay within the city walls, and avoid travel in the area especially through the colored forest,” the police chief said.

Meanwhile, family and friends of Twinkles wait for answers.

“This is what happens when you’re too positive and too open minded,” Twinkles mother said. “We should have raised her up to be more suspicious.”