Repairs and Upgrades

Uke Dawk-Tuh: Repairs and Upgrades

 

Call to make an appointment: 303-984-0777

 

Here are some of the services I provide. I work on most stringed instruments including ukuleles, guitars, banjos, banjoleles, mandolins, violins, and violas, and most importantly, if I don’t think a project can be done for a decent price, I’ll let you know that right up front.

  1. Free Check-up: You just bought a ukulele or guitar (and heaven forbid it’s from that warehouse “music” shop), or you picked it up at one of the better music shops in town, or from Amazon, or from some dude on Craigslist who smelled like coconuts, or the ol’ guy at church gave you his. However you came to own your instrument, call me and let’s get together right away to make sure your new buddy is set up correctly and is going to be ready to turn you into a rawk star. I have been working on lots of ukuleles lately with troubles right out of the box, and if you’re new to the biz, you might now know how to tell if you’ve got a lemon or lemonade. I’ll look it over for free. If it’s good, I’ll tell you that; if it’s a turkey, I’ll tell you what your next steps should be.
  2. Set-ups! Yes, you need to change modern strings at least once a year. Yes, your intonation needs to be checked. Yes, the action probably needs a little tweak. Yes, you can play better and easier with a proper setup. I’ve been at this a long time so give some thought to sitting down with me and making your instrument a better friend.
  3. String Changes: I can do it for you, or I can teach you to do it yourself. Turn off those confusing YouTube videos and come down and let’s turn it into a social activity. By the way, ukulele players, if your strings are white, you’re playing strings we desperately need to change even if they’re relatively new. I have made a personal goal to rid the world of Nylagut one set of strings at a time.
  4. Straps and Buttons: Always a great joy to take a hammer and a drill to your ukulele. You might not want to do that ugly stuff yourself so let me help you. While you’re picking out a great strap, I will sneak a button onto the end of your ukulele and you’ll end the struggle of trying to hold onto your instrument forever.
  5. Electronic Pickup Installations: When you realize you want the neighbors to hear what an awesome musician you’ve become, it’s time to take your favorite acoustic, add the pickup that seems the best from hours and hours of YouTube review watching, and bring it to me to amp you up. When it’s done, you’ll have an active or passive menace ready to light up the nighttime with your sultry tones and megawatt bass lines.
  6. New Hardware: Hate those tuners? Need a non-broken nut? Saddles and bridges upgrades? There’s no reason to put up with the crummy hardware they sent with your baby. If you like the tone of your ukulele or guitar, let’s get to work putting on the equipment you really wanted to be on there in the first place.
  7. Fretwork: It’s tedious and boring, but in Colorado it needs to be done. Wood tends to shrink in our climate as it loses moisture and those frets end up wonky. Let me toil away sculpting them into friendliness.
  8. Rescuing Battered and Abused Instruments: Mostly old guitars and old ukuleles aren’t worth fixing. Mostly. That’s why most of the repair shops won’t waste their time on them. You don’t want to spend more on it than it’s worth … mostly. And I’m more than happy to discuss if a project is worth doing. On the other hand, sometimes you just love your pawn shop find, or grampa’s banjolele, or the guitar you bought in Sweden, or the ukulele you found in a trashcan. Sometimes it’s worth fussing over a sad old instrument to polish it up into a happy old instrument. Let’s look at your old beast and see if we can see a way to turn it into a beauty.

I don’t do significant woodworking on instruments. I can direct you to the two guys in town that I think are amazing luthiers and you can decide with them whether the price you’re looking at will be worth it.